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Columbia Global Centers 10th Anniversary

Date: 
Wednesday, April 10, 2019

ANNOUNCING A YEAR-LONG 10-EVENT CELEBRATION FOR OUR 10TH ANNIVERSARY!
In March 2009 the Columbia Global Centers launched with two Centers in Amman and Beijing. Today, our network includes nine Centers – Amman, Beijing, Istanbul, Mumbai, Nairobi, Paris, Rio, Santiago, and Tunis. Ten years...

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Changes in Ocean ‘Conveyor Belt’ Foretold Abrupt Climate Changes by Four Centuries

Date: 
Wednesday, April 3, 2019

In the Atlantic Ocean, a giant ‘conveyor belt’ carries warm waters from the tropics into the North Atlantic, where they cool and sink and then return southwards in the deep ocean. This circulation pattern is an important player in the global climate, regulating weather patterns in the Arctic,...

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Columbia Obama Scholars share personal stories tackling international public health challenges at inaugural roundtable

Date: 
Thursday, March 14, 2019

Members of Columbia’s inaugural cohort of Obama Scholars spoke about their work conducting public healthcare research, finding cost-effective diagnosis and treatment options, and raising feminine hygiene awareness at the first roundtable event of the semester Tuesday evening.

The panel—“...

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News

Columbia Celebrates Opening of Institute for Ideas and Imagination

Date: 
Monday, November 12, 2018

Joined by France’s Minister of Higher Education and world renowned artists, the Columbia community gathered at Reid Hall in Paris today to celebrate the opening of the Institute for Ideas and Imagination. Created to challenge longstanding traditions that govern the ways in which knowledge is...

Image: 
Reid Hall Courtyard
News

Inaugural Group of Obama Foundation Scholars at Columbia University Announced

Date: 
Wednesday, August 29, 2018

An accomplished group of 12 rising social change-makers from around the world has been selected as the first class of Obama Foundation Scholars at Columbia University. Consistent with the Obama Foundation’s mission to inspire, empower, and connect the next generation of civic leaders, the new,...

A First Step Towards Behavioral Coaching for Managing Stress: A Case Study on Optimal Policy Estimation with Multi-stage Threshold Q-learning

Psychological stress is a major contributor to the adoption of unhealthy behaviors, which in turn accounts for 41% of global cardiovascular disease burden. While the proliferation of mobile health apps has offered promise to stress management, these apps do not provide micro-level feedback with regard to how to adjust one's behaviors to achieve a desired health outcome. In this paper, we formulate the task of multi-stage stress management as a sequential decision-making problem and explore the application of reinforcement learning to provide micro-level feedback for stress reduction. Specifically, we incorporate a multi-stage threshold selection into Q-learning to derive an interpretable form of a recommendation policy for behavioral coaching. We apply this method on an observational dataset that contains Fitbit ActiGraph measurements and self-reported stress levels. The estimated policy is then used to understand how exercise patterns may affect users' psychological stress levels and to perform coaching more effectively.

Topic: 
Author: 
Xinyu Hu
Pei Hsueh-Yun S.
Ching Chen-Hua
Keith Diaz
Ying Kuen Cheung
Min Qian
Subjects: 
Stress management
Cardiovascular system--Diseases--Prevention
Health
Title string: 
A First Step Towards Behavioral Coaching for Managing Stress: A Case Study on Optimal Policy Estimation with Multi-stage Threshold Q-learning
GUID update: 
https://academiccommons.columbia.edu/catalog/ac:kh18931zg1

Rethinking Child Protection in Emergencies

The humanitarian system is struggling to adapt to changes in the global political environment, trends in armed conflict and displacement, and advances in science and technology. In recent years, the international community has undertaken a number of efforts to overcome these challenges, such as the Agenda for Humanity, a plan that outlines the changes needed to alleviate suffering, reduce risk, and lessen vulnerability on a global scale. This article reviews recent evidence from a range of disciplines to inform these efforts, especially as they relate to the protection of children. Early childhood and adolescence constitute two critical periods of child development that lay the foundations for future health and wellbeing. Exposure to adversity in crisis contexts can compromise this development, with potentially life-long consequences. Evidence suggests that relationships with caregivers and peers play a central role in mediating childhood experiences of adversity. Unfortunately, interventions for children affected by crises are usually too fragmented to maximize the protective effects of healthy relationships. This article stresses the importance of developing multisectoral and relational interventions capable of promoting healthy development across the life course. Given the central role of caregivers, the household is an especially powerful level of intervention for combining approaches from different sectors. More concerted efforts are needed to develop household interventions that combine traditional sectoral approaches with innovative, cross-cutting measures, such as cash transfers and parental support. Household interventions should also be an integral part of broader community and society level actions, which together form more comprehensive systems of care.

Topic: 
Publication type: 
Author: 
Cyril Bennouna
Hanna Fischer-Tina
Michael G. Wessells
Neil G. Boothby
Subjects: 
Emergency management
Child welfare
Humanitarian assistance
Humanitarian intervention
Children
Title string: 
Rethinking Child Protection in Emergencies
GUID update: 
https://academiccommons.columbia.edu/catalog/ac:dncjsxksq9
News

Columbia Brings Scholars and Artists Together at New Paris Institute

Date: 
Monday, May 7, 2018

Columbia’s Institute for Ideas and Imagination has announced its first cohort of fellows, a group of 16 preeminent scholars, writers, and artists from around the world who are being brought together for year-long residencies at Reid Hall in Paris. Reid Hall is the home of Columbia Global Centers...

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Digging Into Easter Island's Climate History

Date: 
Wednesday, May 2, 2018

During March, a team of scientists led by William D’Andrea, associate research professor at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, travelled to Rapa Nui (Easter Island) to work on a major research project in the island’s most important wetlands. The collaborative field team also...

Essays on Organization, Creativity, and Globalization

This dissertation examines an underexplored type of innovation - the discovery of new resources. Schumpeter distinguishes among five types of innovation: new products, new processes, new organizations, new markets, and new resources. Most prior work has focused on the first three types of innovation. This study focuses on the last type of innovation, the discovery of new resources, in creative industries where talent is the most important resource of creativity and profit. This dissertation is comprised of three chapters. Each of the chapters examines a strategy or an environmental change such as unbundling, digitalization, and cross-border acquisition which may facilitate or weaken the discovery of new talent and experiment with new artists. In the first chapter, I explore the impact of unbundling on the discovery of new talent. The results highlight the trade-off between breadth-oriented experimentation (experimenting with more new alternatives by producing unbundled products) and depth-oriented experimentation (collecting more accurate information on fewer alternatives by producing bundled products) and suggest that unbundling may facilitate firms’ breadth-oriented experimentation and the discovery of new talent. In the second chapter, I investigate whether digitalization (digital market) facilitated the discovery of new talent by entrepreneurial firms. Digitalization offers diverse niche opportunities from a long-tail market and decreases the cost of experimenting with new artists. However, the findings from this chapter suggest that entrepreneurial firms did not benefit from such opportunities; iTunes and YouTube did not facilitate entrepreneurial firms’ discovery of new talent and experimentation with new artists (compared to incumbent firms). In the third chapter, I turn to look at the impact of foreign ownership or capital on the discovery of new domestic talent. The “liability of foreignness” argument suggests that foreign ownership may weaken the discovery of new talent from the host country because foreign owners may lack a good understanding of the host country culture. This study analyzes the case of Sony’s acquisition of CBS Records (a US major label) in 1988, which is the first merger by a Japanese firm with a firm of a distant culture. The results suggest that Sony did not undermine CBS Records’ discovery of domestic new talent but instead increased the popularity of new domestic artists in CBS Records and its subsidiaries.

Topic: 
Author: 
Sungyong Chang
Subjects: 
Management
Globalization
Creative ability
Organizational change
Title string: 
Essays on Organization, Creativity, and Globalization
GUID update: 
https://academiccommons.columbia.edu/catalog/ac:xwdbrv15j7

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