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Topics described under the heading Culture (C) include: Arts; Design, Ethics: Education; Entrepreneurship; Identity; Religion, Music; Markets; Climate Change; Music; Education Other topics will be added as our collaborative web space expands.

Culture

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Two Professors Win Major Architecture Awards

Date: 
Friday, July 5, 2019

By Eve Glasberg
May 08, 2019

Mabel O. Wilson and Mario Gooden are honored for their work exploring the African diaspora.

Mabel O. Wilson and Mario Gooden, professors at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, are among the 2019  winners of the...

News

Creating a Currency to Raise Awareness

Date: 
Friday, July 5, 2019

By Jessica Reyes
May 09, 2019

Valor y Cambio: A Community Currency Project in Puerto Rico - https://www.youtube.com/embed/tNOfdwgONR8

Columbia University congratulates Professor Frances Negrón-Muntaner, recipient of the...

News

Columbia Global Centers 10th Anniversary

Date: 
Wednesday, April 10, 2019

ANNOUNCING A YEAR-LONG 10-EVENT CELEBRATION FOR OUR 10TH ANNIVERSARY!
In March 2009 the Columbia Global Centers launched with two Centers in Amman and Beijing. Today, our network includes nine Centers – Amman, Beijing, Istanbul, Mumbai, Nairobi, Paris, Rio, Santiago, and Tunis. Ten years...

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Changes in Ocean ‘Conveyor Belt’ Foretold Abrupt Climate Changes by Four Centuries

Date: 
Wednesday, April 3, 2019

In the Atlantic Ocean, a giant ‘conveyor belt’ carries warm waters from the tropics into the North Atlantic, where they cool and sink and then return southwards in the deep ocean. This circulation pattern is an important player in the global climate, regulating weather patterns in the Arctic,...

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Columbia Obama Scholars share personal stories tackling international public health challenges at inaugural roundtable

Date: 
Thursday, March 14, 2019

Members of Columbia’s inaugural cohort of Obama Scholars spoke about their work conducting public healthcare research, finding cost-effective diagnosis and treatment options, and raising feminine hygiene awareness at the first roundtable event of the semester Tuesday evening.

The panel—“...

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News

New Department Augments the Study of African Americans and the African Diaspora

Date: 
Monday, December 3, 2018

On Saturday, December 1, Columbia University’s Board of Trustees voted to confirm the creation of the African American and African Diaspora Studies department. This new department will bring a fresh approach to the discipline at a crucial moment in race relations and black identity within our...

Image: 
Morningside Campus
News

Columbia Celebrates Opening of Institute for Ideas and Imagination

Date: 
Monday, November 12, 2018

Joined by France’s Minister of Higher Education and world renowned artists, the Columbia community gathered at Reid Hall in Paris today to celebrate the opening of the Institute for Ideas and Imagination. Created to challenge longstanding traditions that govern the ways in which knowledge is...

Image: 
Reid Hall Courtyard
News

Inaugural Group of Obama Foundation Scholars at Columbia University Announced

Date: 
Wednesday, August 29, 2018

An accomplished group of 12 rising social change-makers from around the world has been selected as the first class of Obama Foundation Scholars at Columbia University. Consistent with the Obama Foundation’s mission to inspire, empower, and connect the next generation of civic leaders, the new,...

Itaataatawi: Hopi Song, Intellectual Property, and Sonic Sovereignty in an Era of Settler-Colonialism

Hopi traditional songs or taatawi are more than aesthetic objects; they are sound-based expressions of Hopi authority. As I argue in this dissertation, creating, performing, circulating, and remembering taatawi are what we might call acts of sonic sovereignty: a mode of authority articulated within ongoing, sound-based networks that include Hopi people, plants, weather systems, land, and other living things within Hopi territories.
I begin by exploring the generative process through which taatawi do their connective work, which includes long-term collaborations between yeeyewat (composers) and environmental actors that establish a collective vision of prosperity that is realized when these songs are performed. Hopi composer Clark Tenakhongva’s taatawi performances during Grand Canyon National Park’s Centennial (a Hopi sacred space currently controlled by settler governments) exemplify the ways Hopi people are actively using taatawi to (re)assert Hopi relations to colonized territories.
Because taatawi are closely tied to Hopi relations to one another and the land, and sometimes contain specialized forms of knowledge held closely by Hopi clans and ceremonial societies, their ownership and circulation remains of vital concern to Hopi people. Laura Boulton’s recording of Hopi singers Dan Qötshongva, Thomas Bahnaqya and David Monongye in the Summer of 1940, and the travels of those recordings afterwards, show us the complex politics of Hopi song circulation in the early Twentieth Century up through the present, and how settler cultural and intellectual property laws provide only limited possibilities for indigenous groups seeking to bring their ancestors’ voices back under their control. And even if tribes could reclaim taatawi under settler property laws, these laws require physical and conceptual transformations that effectively sever them from the networks of relations from which they were created.
To better support Hopi sonic sovereignty going forward, I offer brief sketches for three potential interventions: (1) an indigenous works amendment to the United States Copyright Act; (2) the use of indigenized licensing frameworks to embed indigenous protocols into the governance and circulation of indigenous creative works both on and off indigenous lands; and (3) establishing a right to indigenous care, similar to Europe’s right to forget, whereby our ancestors’ voices can be subject to indigenous care rather than preserved anonymously and perpetually as archival objects. My hope is that these will allow indigenous communities to better assert and maintain control over their modes of sonic sovereignty despite the increasing colonization of the sonic world by global intellectual property regimes.

Department: 
Music
Author: 
Trevor George Reed
Subjects: 
Music
Songs
Hopi
Indians of North America--Music
Intellectual property
Hopi Indians
Sovereignty
Title string: 
Itaataatawi: Hopi Song, Intellectual Property, and Sonic Sovereignty in an Era of Settler-Colonialism
GUID update: 
https://academiccommons.columbia.edu/catalog/ac:m905qftths

Microbial community structure in the western tropical South Pacific

Oligotrophic regions play a central role in global biogeochemical cycles, with microbial communities in these areas representing an important term in global carbon budgets. While the general structure of microbial communities has been well documented in the global ocean, some remote regions such as the western tropical South Pacific (WTSP) remain fundamentally unexplored. Moreover, the biotic and abiotic factors constraining microbial abundances and distribution remain not well resolved. In this study, we quantified the spatial (vertical and horizontal) distribution of major microbial plankton groups along a transect through the WTSP during the austral summer of 2015, capturing important autotrophic and heterotrophic assemblages including cytometrically determined abundances of non-pigmented protists (also called flagellates). Using environmental parameters (e.g., nutrients and light availability) as well as statistical analyses, we estimated the role of bottom–up and top–down controls in constraining the structure of the WTSP microbial communities in biogeochemically distinct regions. At the most general level, we found a “typical tropical structure”, characterized by a shallow mixed layer, a clear deep chlorophyll maximum at all sampling sites, and a deep nitracline. Prochlorococcus was especially abundant along the transect, accounting for 68 ± 10.6 % of depth-integrated phytoplankton biomass. Despite their relatively low abundances, picophytoeukaryotes (PPE) accounted for up to 26 ± 11.6 % of depth-integrated phytoplankton biomass, while Synechococcus accounted for only 6 ± 6.9 %. Our results show that the microbial community structure of the WTSP is typical of highly stratified regions, and underline the significant contribution to total biomass by PPE populations. Strong relationships between N2 fixation rates and plankton abundances demonstrate the central role of N2 fixation in regulating ecosystem processes in the WTSP, while comparative analyses of abundance data suggest microbial community structure to be increasingly regulated by bottom–up processes under nutrient limitation, possibly in response to shifts in abundances of high nucleic acid bacteria (HNA).

Publication type: 
Author: 
Nicholas Andrew Bock
Van France Wambeke
Mo Dionïra
Solange Duhamel
Subjects: 
Microbial ecology
Biogeochemistry
Statistics
Marine plankton
Oceanography
Title string: 
Microbial community structure in the western tropical South Pacific
GUID update: 
https://academiccommons.columbia.edu/catalog/ac:wwpzgmsbgd

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