Skip to main content
News

Students Will Report from Private Sector Forum on Migration and Refugees

Date: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Student rapporteurs including seven current SIPA enrollees will take part in next week’s Private Sector Forum on Migration and Refugees, a gathering of more than 200 UN...

News

Redefining a University's Role for a World in Crisis

Date: 
Tuesday, September 13, 2016

"With civil conflict, terrorist threats, and major health crises causing unprecedented disruption in communities all over the world, universities must step up to a new level of globalism in our outlook and in our activities," says ...

His Excellency Luis Guillermo Solís Rivera, President of the Republic of Costa Rica

This World Leaders Forum program features an address by His Excellency Luis Guillermo Solís Rivera, President of the Republic of Costa Rica, followed by a question and answer session with the audience.

Co-Sponsored by the Institute of Latin American Studies.

Registration will open on Friday, September 16, at 11:30 a.m.

Event Date: 
Friday, September 23, 2016 - 11:30am to 12:30pm
Event Location: 
Rotunda, Low Memorial Library

Her Excellency Isabel de Saint Malo de Alvarado, Vice President and Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Panama

This World Leaders Forum program features an address by Her Excellency Isabel de Saint Malo de Alvarado, Vice President and Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Panama, followed by a question and answer session with the audience.

Co-Sponsored by the Greater Caribbean Studies Center.

Registration will open on Friday, September 16, at 10:00 a.m.

Event Date: 
Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
Event Location: 
Rotunda, Low Memorial Library

Associated Global A-Z item

Symposium on Displaced Scholars

The program will feature introductory remarks from Lee C. Bollinger, President, Columbia University, and Allan E. Goodman, President and Chief Executive Officer, Institute of International Education, a panel of experts, a discussion with displaced scholars titled, Symposium on Displaced Scholars, followed by a question and answer session with the audience.

Co-Sponsored by the Institute of International Education.

Registration will open on Thursday, September 15, at 4:00 p.m.

Event Date: 
Monday, September 19, 2016 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Event Location: 
Rotunda, Low Memorial Library
Topic: 
Regions: 

Associated Global A-Z item

Committee on Global Thought (CGT) Lunchtime Seminar with Henry Rousso

The Latest Catastrophe: History, the Present, the Contemporary

Professor Henry Rousso

Moderated by Carol Gluck

November 17, 2016 · 12-1PM

Columbia University, Fayerweather Hall, Room 411

The Committee on Global Thought (CGT) Lunchtime Seminars are a forum for Columbia University faculty and visiting scholars to discuss current research characterizing and assessing issues of global importance. Open to Columbia affiliates only. No registration is required. Light lunch will be available.

About the speaker

Henry Rousso is an Adjunct Professor for the Department of History at Columbia University. He first worked on the history of the Second World War and post-war period. His early writings focused on political and economic history of the Vichy regime. Then he turned to a history of memory of the war and spent much of his thinking to the history of collective memory and uses of the past. He is currently working in a multidisciplinary and comparative perspective on the relationship between history, memory and justice, and more generally on the epistemology of contemporary history.

Event Date: 
Thursday, November 17, 2016 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Event Location: 
Columbia University, Fayerweather Hall, Room 411
Topic: 
Regions: 

Associated Global A-Z item

Associated Faculty: 

Committee on Global Thought (CGT) Lunchtime Seminar with Joseph R. Slaughter

Hijacking Human Rights: Neoliberalism and the End of the Third World

Professor Joseph R. Slaughter

October 6, 2016 · 12-1PM

Columbia University, Fayerweather Hall, Room 411

The Committee on Global Thought (CGT) Lunchtime Seminars are a forum for Columbia University faculty and visiting scholars to discuss current research characterizing and assessing issues of global importance. Open to Columbia affiliates only. No registration is required. Light lunch will be available.

About the discussion

Over the past decade, a new historiography of human rights has identified the 1970s as the crucial period when human rights discourse gained traction globally. Most of the historians working in this mode adopt a North Atlantic perspective on the history and concept of human rights; they relegate stories and struggles outside the U.S. and Europe to minor, inconsequential, or irrelevant uses of the languages of human rights. The story of the West’s reduction of human rights to a limited set of individual civil and political protections against state abuses in the 70s cannot be told without recognizing the dramatic foreclosure of other more radical visions of human rights that still obtained in the Third and Fourth Worlds: national self-determination, economic redistribution, and social and cultural security. If the 1970s was the decade of human rights, it was also the decade of hijackings, many of which were undertaken in the name of those broader struggles. As Joseph Slaughter argues, however, none of those airline hijackings was quite as effective as the neo-liberal hijacking of human rights.

About the speaker

Joseph R. Slaughter is an Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. He specializes in literature, law, and socio-cultural history of the Global South (particularly Latin America and Africa). He’s especially interested in the social work of literature—the myriad ways in which literature intersects (formally, historically, ideologically, materially) with problems of social justice, human rights, intellectual property, and international law.

His honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship, Public Voices Fellowship, Lenfest Distinguished Faculty Award. His book Human Rights, Inc.: The World Novel, Narrative Form, and International Law (Fordham UP, 2007), which explores the cooperative narrative logics of international human rights law and the Bildungsroman, was awarded the 2008 René Wellek prize for comparative literature and cultural theory. His essay, “Enabling Fictions and Novel Subjects: The Bildungsroman and International Human Rights Law,” was honored as one of the two best articles published in PMLA in 2006-7. He was elected to serve as President of the American Comparative Literature Association in 2016.

His essays and articles include : “World Literature as Property” in Alif: Journal of Comparative Poetics; “However Incompletely, Human” in The Meanings of Human Rights: Philosophy, Critical Theory, Law; “‘It’s good to be primitive’: African Allusion and the Modernist Fetish of Authenticity” in Modernism and Copyright; “The Enchantment of Human Rights; or, What Difference Does Humanitarian Indifference Make?” in Critical Quarterly; “Vanishing Points: When Narrative Is Not Simply There” in The Journal of Human Rights; “‘A Mouth with Which to Tell the Story’: Silence, Violence, and Speech in the Narrative of Things Fall Apart” in Emerging Perspectives on Chinua Achebe; “Master Plans: Designing (National) Allegories of Urban Space and Metropolitan Subjects for Postcolonial Kenya” in Research in African Literatures; “Introducing Human Rights and Literary Form; Or, the Vehicles and Vocabularies of Human Rights,” co-authored with Sophia A. McClennen, in Comparative Literature Studies; “A Question of Narration: The Voice in International Human Rights Law” in Human Rights Quarterly; “Humanitarian Reading” in Humanitarianism and Suffering: The Mobilization of Empathy through Narrative. Slaughter is a founding co-editor of Humanity: An International Journal of Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and Development.

He is co-editing a volume of essays, The Global South Atlantic, that explores some of the many social, cultural, political, and material interactions across the oceanic space between Africa and Latin America that have made it historically (im)possible to imagine the South Atlantic as a coherent region. He is currently working on two monographs, “Pathetic Fallacies: Essays on Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and the Humanities” and “New Word Orders: Intellectual Property and World Literature,” which considers the role of plagiarism, piracy, and intellectual property regimes in the globalization of the novel, as well the work the novel might do to interrupt globalization and to resist monopoly privatization of cultural and intellectual creations.

Event Date: 
Thursday, October 6, 2016 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Event Location: 
Columbia University, Fayerweather Hall, Room 411
Topic: 
Regions: 

Associated Global A-Z item

Committee on Global Thought (CGT) Lunchtime Seminar with Kian Tajbakhsh

The Limits of Global Thought: Western Social and Human Sciences on Trial

Professor Kian Tajbakhsh

September 22, 2016 · 12-1PM

Columbia University, Fayerweather Hall, Room 411

The Committee on Global Thought (CGT) Lunchtime Seminars are a forum for Columbia University faculty and visiting scholars to discuss current research characterizing and assessing issues of global importance. Open to Columbia affiliates only. No registration is required. Light lunch will be available.

About the speaker

Kian Tajbakhsh is Visiting Professor of Urban Planning at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation (GSAPP). He has taught at both American and Iranian universities. Tajbakhsh’s academic research spans both theoretical and policy projects related to the culture of urbanism as well as the governance of cities and metropolitan regions. He has conducted empirical research on decentralization, the role of social capital in local government performance, and local economic development in a number of countries.

He is the author of two books, The Promise of the City: Space, Identity and Politics in Contemporary Social Thought (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press 2001), and Social Capital: Trust, Democracy and Development (Tehran: Shiraze Publishers 2005, in Persian). He co-edited the book City Diplomacy: The role of local governments in conflict prevention, peace-building, post-conflict reconstruction (Arne Munsch, 2008 The Hague). Tajbakhsh has also published scholarly articles, as well as essays on cinema and culture in Iran and India.

Tajbakhsh is an international expert in the areas of local government reform, urban planning, civil society capacity building and international public policy research collaboration. He has also directed international projects in the areas of public health and social policy. Tajbakhsh’s policy-related research and consulting has examined decentralization and local government institutions in Iran and other developing societies with a focus on increasing the legitimacy of local political institutions and the effectiveness of local participation.

Event Date: 
Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Event Location: 
Columbia University, Fayerweather Hall, Room 411
Topic: 
Regions: 

Associated Global A-Z item

Undergraduate: “Talk with Professor” Rashid Khalidi

Revisiting Palestine’s History

with Rashid Khalidi

September 21, 2016 • 4:30-5:30PM

Columbia University, Knox Hall, Room 208

Join Professor Rashid Khalidi for a conversation on the Palestine’s history. The Talks with Professors series allows students to engage in casual and meaningful conversations with distinguished scholars in a laid-back, informal setting. Open to Columbia University students only.

About the speaker

Rashid Khalidi is the Edward Said Professor of Arab Studies. He received his B.A. from Yale University in 1970, and his D.Phil. from Oxford University in 1974. He has taught at the Lebanese University, the American University of Beirut, Georgetown University, and at the University of Chicago. He is past President of the Middle East Studies Association, and the editor of the Journal of Palestine Studies.

Khalidi is the author of Brokers of Deceit: How the U.S. has Undermined Peace in the Middle East, 2013, winner of the Lionel Trilling Book Award and the MEMO Book Award; Sowing Crisis: American Dominance and the Cold War in the Middle East, 2009; The Iron Cage: The Story of the Palestinian Struggle for Statehood, 2006, translated into French, Arabic and Hebrew; Resurrecting Empire: Western Footprints and America’s Perilous Path in the Middle East, 2004 translated into French, Italian and Spanish; Palestinian Identity: The Construction of Modern National Consciousness, 1997 winner of the Middle East Studies Association’s Albert Hourani Prize for best book of 1997, translated into Arabic, French, Italian and Spanish and reissued with a new introduction in 2010; Under Siege: PLO Decision-making during the 1982 War, 1986, translated into Arabic and Hebrew and reissued with a new preface in 2014; and British Policy towards Syria and Palestine, 1906-1914, 1980. He is the co-editor of Palestine and the Gulf, 1982, and The Origins of Arab Nationalism, 1991, and has written over 110 scholarly articles.

He has written for The New York Times, The Financial Times, The Boston Globe, The Los Angeles Times, The Chicago Tribune, Vanguardia, The London Review of Books, and The Nation. He has been interviewed in Le Monde, Haaretz, Milliyet, al-Quds, and The Chronicle of Higher Education. He has been a guest on radio and TV shows including All Things Considered, Talk of the Nation, Morning Edition, The News Hour, The Charlie Rose Show, GPS with Fareed Zakaria, Amanpour on CNN International, and Nightline, and on the BBC, Radio France Inter and France Culture, the CBC, al-Jazeera, al-‘Arabiyya, Russia Today, and the Voice of America.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Event Location: 
Columbia University, Knox Hall, Room 208
Topic: 

Associated Global A-Z item

News

Professor Peter L. Strauss to Deliver Keynote Address at University of Cambridge Conference on Future of Public Law

Date: 
Monday, September 12, 2016

New York, September 12, 2016—Columbia Law School Professor Peter L. Strauss will deliver a keynote address Tuesday, Sept. 13 at a major international conference on public law hosted by the University of...

Pages