Skip to main content

Nations within Nations: Transnationalism and Indigenous Citizenship in Latin America

This chapter explores strategies followed by indigenous peoples— both men and women—to produce new forms of gender and cultural difference within local and global shared and connected spaces. I focus on how these processes force us to rethink the politics of space, community, identity, and citizenship in Latin America. For that purpose, national constitutions and international agreements (e.g., the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, 2007) are analyzed as key loci that illustrate how transnational imaginary significations, related to identity and citizenship, have traveled from local to global spheres, making possible the recognition of indigenous rights. I discuss contributions made by articulation theory to understand processes of creation of ethnic sameness and difference that are at the core of these emergent transnational citizenship projects pursued by indigenous movements.

Topic: 
Publication type: 
Author: 
Marcela Tovar-Restrepo
Subjects: 
Ethnic studies
Title string: 
Nations within Nations: Transnationalism and Indigenous Citizenship in Latin America
GUID update: 
http://academiccommons.columbia.edu/catalog/ac:201922

Of Making Many Copies There is No End: The Digitization of Manuscripts and Printed Books in Arabic Script

The essay explores the relationship between writing, the digitization of manuscripts and printed books, and Digital Humanities in Middle East Eastern and Islamic Studies. It argues that the long intellectual tradition of textual pragmatism in Islamic civilization informs the current interaction with electronic texts and digital surrogates.

Topic: 
Publication type: 
Author: 
Dagmar A. Riedel
Subjects: 
Middle Eastern studies
Archival materials--Digitization
Digital libraries
Islam--Research
Arabic language
Title string: 
Of Making Many Copies There is No End: The Digitization of Manuscripts and Printed Books in Arabic Script
GUID update: 
http://academiccommons.columbia.edu/catalog/ac:195434

City Knights: Urban Networking and City Life in Late Medieval Iberia

Civil uprisings, urban networking, and civil life, no matter how contemporary it is, must also be historicized. The genealogy of current international issues of global nature raises also the question of how and by what means city life and urban networking became a crucial element for the opposition of central powers, and why collective practices of power where thus devised in order to fight against monarchical and oligarchical models. Historicizing the uprisings also means to investigate into the procedures whereby urban networking and city life established lists and programs of concrete requests and structures of control that were put forth for negotiation in legally constituted assemblies. Historicizing is definitely a way to understand the process whereby a society is created by means of processes of association and assembling or re-assembling, giving us, thus, a better understanding of social movements in general (Latour 2005). Medieval chivalry. Medieval bourgeois organizations. Fraternities. Brotherhoods.

Topic: 
Publication type: 
Author: 
Jesus D. Rodriguez-Velasco
Subjects: 
European history
Title string: 
City Knights: Urban Networking and City Life in Late Medieval Iberia
GUID update: 
http://academiccommons.columbia.edu/catalog/ac:195014

Introduction to "The Trouble With the Congo: Local Violence and the Failure of International Peacebuilding"

The Trouble with the Congo suggests a new explanation for international peacebuilding failures in civil wars. Drawing from more than 330 interviews and a year and a half of field research, it develops a case study of the international intervention during the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s unsuccessful transition from war to peace and democracy (2003–2006). Grassroots rivalries over land, resources, and political power motivated widespread violence. However, a dominant peacebuilding culture shaped the intervention strategy in a way that precluded action on local conflicts, ultimately dooming the international efforts to end the deadliest conflict since World War II. Most international actors interpreted continued fighting as the consequence of national and regional tensions alone, and diplomats and United Nations staff viewed intervention at the macro levels as their only legitimate responsibility. The dominant culture constructed local peacebuilding as such an unimportant, unfamiliar, and unmanageable task that neither shocking events nor resistance from certain individuals could convince international actors to reevaluate their understanding of violence and intervention. Through this in-depth analysis, The Trouble with the Congo proposes innovative ways to address civil wars in Africa and beyond.

UNI: 
Publication type: 
Author: 
Severine Autesserre
Subjects: 
Political science
Peace studies
International relations
Peace-building
Conflict management--International cooperation
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Title string: 
Introduction to "The Trouble With the Congo: Local Violence and the Failure of International Peacebuilding"
GUID update: 
http://academiccommons.columbia.edu/catalog/ac:193885

Bailing out the planet

Mount Pinatubo, a volcano in the Philippines that had been dormant for over 400 years, began to rumble on April 2, 1991. Two months later, volcanic activity went into overdrive, culminating in a final explosion on June 15.

As a direct result of the volcanic eruption, global temperatures temporarily decreased by about 0.5°C (0.9°F), wiping out the entire temperature effects of human-caused global warming up to that point.

Mount Pinatubo did all that by spewing some 20 million tons of sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere. That amount counteracted the global warming effect of around 585 billion tons of carbon dioxide that humans had managed to put into the atmosphere by then.

Two years later, after most of the sulfur dioxide from Mount Pinatubo had washed out of the atmosphere, temperatures jumped back by the same 0.5°C and resumed growth where it left off.

Excerpted from “Climate Shock: The Economic Consequences of a Hotter Planet” by Gernot Wagner and Martin L. Weitzman.

Publication type: 
Author: 
Gernot Wagner
Martin L. Weitzman
Subjects: 
Climate change
Public policy
International relations
Title string: 
Bailing out the planet
GUID update: 
http://academiccommons.columbia.edu/catalog/ac:190950

How to steer clear of the looming climate shock

Stick it to carbon, not the man. Two quick questions: Do you think climate change is an urgent problem? Do you think getting the world off fossil fuels is difficult? Excerpted from Climate Shock (2015) by Gernot Wagner and Martin L. Weitzman. Published here with permission from Princeton University Press. Published on Ensia.com on February 25th, 2015.

Publication type: 
Author: 
Gernot Wagner
Subjects: 
Public policy
Climate change
Economics
Climatic changes--Government policy
Environmental economics
Title string: 
How to steer clear of the looming climate shock
GUID update: 
http://academiccommons.columbia.edu/catalog/ac:190935

How does climate stack up against other worst-case scenarios?

Climate isn’t the only catastrophe threatening the planet, but it may be the one most in need of attention and resources. The following is excerpted from Climate Shock (2015) by Gernot Wagner and Martin L. Weitzman. Published here with permission from Princeton University Press. Published on Ensia.com on April 1st, 2015.

Publication type: 
Author: 
Gernot Wagner
Martin L. Weitzman
Subjects: 
Public policy
Climate change
Climatic changes--Government policy
Climatic changes
Title string: 
How does climate stack up against other worst-case scenarios?
GUID update: 
http://academiccommons.columbia.edu/catalog/ac:190947

The planet won’t notice you recycle, and your vote doesn’t count

Put a group of economists in a room to debate the wisdom and virtue of individual action, and soon they’ll be debating the value of casting one’s vote: zero—in some strict, narrow, “economic” sense of the world. We can’t leave things there. It would be both rather depressing and also rather narrow-minded. Maybe statistics and economics alone aren’t the right tools with which to analyze one’s personal action. Ethics, for one, plays an important role. Excerpted from “Climate Shock: The Economic Consequences of a Hotter Planet” by Gernot Wagner and Martin L. Weitzman.

Publication type: 
Author: 
Gernot Wagner
Martin L. Weitzman
Subjects: 
Public policy
Climate change
Climatic changes--Government policy
Climatic changes--Moral and ethical aspects
Title string: 
The planet won’t notice you recycle, and your vote doesn’t count
GUID update: 
http://academiccommons.columbia.edu/catalog/ac:190941

Feelings on Faces. From Physiognomics to Neuroscience

Of all the ways in which the outward signs of the body express inner feeling, physiognomy and gesture have been the most studied. In this essay, I will deal with physiognomy and its related form, pathognomy. Gesture must wait for another occasion. Both physiognomy and the study of gesture, at least in their traditional and historical forms, have generally been taken as the very type of disciplines that have ignored the pressures of culture and difference, failing to take into account the social construction both of interiority and of its outward manifestations. It is true that physiognomy and pathognomy, like the study of gesture, sought to establish fixed correlations between expression and emotion, when in fact the relationship between particular expressions and specific emotions are very oft en the product of cultural and contextual constraints, pressures, and circumstance. Or so the usual insistence runs. Hence, for example, the continuing high scepticism about projects like Charles Le Brun's and the complete disdain of the physiognomic projects of Lavater. Even Darwin's great work on the subject has only recently begun to return to favor (though only hesitantly amongst academic humanists), despite its clear articulation of the role of cultural constraints on emotional expression) In what follows, I will set out how, contrary to conventional views of the neurosciences as reductionist, the neuroscience of facial expression and its emotional recognition does not in fact impugn this role, but substantially enhances it. My aim is to suggest that the role of culture in the construction of both feeling and expression is considerably more complex than current views of cultural determinism seem to allow.

UNI: 
Publication type: 
Author: 
David A. Freedberg
Subjects: 
Neurosciences
Physiological psychology
Sociology
Title string: 
Feelings on Faces. From Physiognomics to Neuroscience
GUID update: 
http://academiccommons.columbia.edu/catalog/ac:190062

The Multiple Futures of the Field of Educational Leadership Research and Practice – An Introduction

As the sixth volume in the International Research on School Leadership series, the contributing authors in this volume consider the history, challenges, and opportunities of the field of research and practice in educational leadership and administration in schools and districts. Ten years after the work of Firestone and Riehl (2005) and their contributing authors, our aim with the present volume was to summarize and update the work of the field, and provide a space to consider the multiple futures of educational leadership in schools and districts, as both challenges and opportunities. The first decade of the twenty-first century brought significant critiques, challenges, and competition to the research and practice of training leaders and administrators of schools and districts around the world. Congruently, the field experienced significant growth and change, as multiple new sub-domains flourished and were founded. Thus, in this volume we were delighted to included excellent chapters from multiple authors that considered the duality of the challenges and opportunities of: • The work of the field of educational leadership and administration research to date. • The opportunities and challenges of new visions of leadership in traditional and non-traditional schools. • The evolving state of research evidence in educational leadership and the increasing sophistication of multiple methodologies, including qualitative research, quantitative modeling, the ability to test theory, and the increasing opportunities brought on by the intersection of data, research, and practice. • The preparation of educational leaders. • And the emerging trends in the professional development of school leaders. The authors of the nine chapters in the present book volume took on this challenge of confronting the duality of not only including the past as we look to the future, but also the duality of the critique of the field in the midst of exciting and significant progress in our knowledge and understanding of leadership in schools. In the first section of the book (Chapters 2, 3 and 4), the authors examine the interplay of educational leadership research and theory as it relates to reform in schools, especially as it relates to serving historically underserved populations globally. In section 2 (Chapters 5 and 6), the authors highlight the importance of methodological considerations in school leadership research as a means to understand theory and practice as well as providing interesting avenues that point to multiple exciting future possibilities through relying on current innovations noted within the chapters. Section 3, (Chapters 7 and 8) examine the research and practice of school leadership preparation, especially as it relates to university-district partnerships and non-traditional school settings. And in the final chapter, (Chapter 9), our capstone contributor provides a means to link the present volume with the past writings on these topics, while also providing a lens to view the exciting possibilities and promises of the multiple futures of the field of educational leadership research and practice.

Publication type: 
Author: 
Alex J. Bowers
Alan R. Shoho
Bruce G. Barnett
Subjects: 
Educational leadership
Educational administration
Title string: 
The Multiple Futures of the Field of Educational Leadership Research and Practice – An Introduction
GUID update: 
http://academiccommons.columbia.edu/catalog/ac:188951

Pages