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Global Law in Finance Network (GLawFiN)

Global Law in Finance Network (GLawFiN)

Background: GLawFiN is a collaborative research project to explore the legal foundations of our domestic and global financial systems. It is a global network of academics and doctoral students devoted to examining the explanatory power of this theory with Katharina Pistor (Columbia Law School), Dan Awrey (Oxford University) and Brigitte Haar (Frankfurt University/House of Finance) and doctoral students drawn from all three universities. 

GlawFiN activities include 

  • Teaching at Columbia and beyond

A Winter School on Law and Finance was held at Columbia University’s Global Center in Paris in January 2014 for 25 doctoral students, postdoctoral fellows and assistant professors in law, economics, history and political economy from around Europe, sponsored by the Institute for New Economic Thinking. The winter school was co-taught by Dan Awrey, Brigitte Haar and Katharina Pistor. Katharina Pistor also taught at St. Gallen University and the Trento Summer School on Financial Crisis.

  • Research

The current focus of joint research projects is securitization, collateralization, and more generally, the legal foundations of liquidity of financial markets 

  • Outreach

A workshop held at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago on 17 June, co-organized and co-sponsored by the Chicago Fed, Notre Dame University, Oxford University and Columbia Law School’s Center on Global Legal Transformation to explore the implication of the Legal Theory of Finance for derivatives markets and their regulation. 

The project is funded jointly by the Max Planck Research Award granted to Katharina Pistor for her work on international financial regulation and the Institute for New Economic Thinking

School(s): 
Law
Principal investigators: 

Associated Global A-Z item

Title string: 
Global Law in Finance Network (GLawFiN)

The Tragedy of Exclusion

Globalization has altered the conditions under which different actors have access to scarce resources, including non-renewable environmental resources that are indispensible for survival. Removing entry barriers to the flow of goods and capital, zoning and titling land and allocating property rights either explicitly to the state or to private agents has in effect created transnational markets in land, its resources and usages. This may well increase efficiency in the use of increasingly scarce arable or habitable land. Efficiency, however, needs to be balanced with justice – especially when access to land and its resources is essential for survival. Justice calls for a shift of attention from how governance affects a given asset or resource and its economic value to how it affects human life, including the norms different people have reason to value. 

Background: In June 2013 the center held a conference on “Governing Access to Essential Resources” at Columbia University in New York. Senior scholars, postdocs and doctoral student from around the world attended the conference. 

The theme plays with Hardin’s famous term of the “tragedy of the commons” and articulates that enclosure and property allocation always entails exclusion and that the plight of the excluded needs to be addressed

It established the intellectual foundation for a multi-year research project now operating under the heading of “The Tragedy of Exclusion”. The theme plays with Hardin’s famous term of the “tragedy of the commons” and articulates that enclosure and property allocation always entails exclusion and that the plight of the excluded needs to be addressed.  In order to deepen our understanding of the development of property regimes in different parts of the world, in the second phase of the project teach-ins and research workshops (Global Think-ins) are held in different parts of the world. 

Activities:

Teaching:

  • Teach-ins for doctoral students and postdocs were held in Bangalore and Mumbai in the spring of 2014

Research

  • Research workshops were held at Columbia’s Global Centers in Mumbai (March 2014) and Istanbul (June 2014). 

The project is funded by Professor Pistor’s Max Planck Research Award.

School(s): 
Law
Principal investigators: 

Associated Global A-Z item

Title string: 
The Tragedy of Exclusion
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Center for the Study of Social Difference

The Center for the Study of Social Difference at Columbia University promotes innovative interdisciplinary scholarship on the role of gender, sexuality, ethnicity and race in global dynamics of power and inequality.
Economics DepartmentHealth Policy and Management Department
Graduate School of Arts & SciencesPublic HealthSchool of the Arts
Title(s): 
University Professor
Email: 
sachs@columbia.edu
Phone: 
212-870-2762
Sociology Department
School of the Arts
Title(s): 
Robert S. Lynd Professor of Sociology
Email: 
sjs2@columbia.edu
Phone: 
212-854-0790
Title(s): 
Michael I. Sovern Professor of Law
Email: 
kpisto@law.columbia.edu
Phone: 
212-854-0068
News

Asia Society’s Vishakha Desai to Join Columbia

Date: 
Thursday, October 4, 2012
Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger has announced that Vishakha Desai, former president and chief executive of the New York-based Asia Society, will join the University as his special advisor for global affairs.
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