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Technological Change Lab (TCLab)

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The Technological Change Lab is a research and advisory program focused on connecting economic theory with development planning practice, especially the origins and impacts of technological changes.

The Technological Change Lab (TCLab) is a research and advisory program associated with the Urban Planning program at Columbia University. It is housed at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) which brings together a vast mix of disciplines and research and professional engagements with cities and regions.

TCLab was founded at Columbia University to focus on connecting economic theory with development planning practice, especially the origins and impacts of technological changes. We work  across multiple industrial sectors and technologies with ongoing and planned projects across several  countries.

What is Technological Change? Technological change is far more than mechanisation and specific devices. In economics, it refers to the process by which changes to the production function come about. In daily life, it refers to new ways of producing goods and services, often with new machines and techniques, variations in the use of capital and labor, and shifts to new forms of economic organization.

Technological change, in other words, is how we make what we make. More broadly, technological change is a process of institutional change having important implications for labor and workers' welfare, especially in countries that are rapidly industrializing. These institutions may encompass norms of work, relations of people with machines, production systems, social rewards and recognition as well as mechanisms for governance, participation and protest. Thus, technological change research is concerned with the political economy of institutions and a governance around growth and equity.

 

People

  • Special Research Scholar in the Center for Sustainable Urban Development in the Earth Institute, Special Lecturer in Architecture, Planning and Preservation and in Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology