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Center for Child, Adolescent and Family Life Epidemiology

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The center investigates epidemiology issues in a manner that includes, but goes beyond, narrow definitions of health.

The Center for Child, Adolescent and Family Life Epidemiology (CAFLE) is grounded in four primary principles. First is the understanding that outcomes for children and families cross traditional boundaries of health, education, and social welfare; therefore, inter-disciplinary research and training are essential. Second, the world we live in is multicultural and global in nature. Old paradigms of developed and developing are no longer appropriate; a global continuum approach is essential. Third, mortality, an important and readily measured outcome, must also be complemented by functional measures such as child development and disability and quality of life. Fourth, there are nearly universal, systematic, and ongoing disparities in access to healthcare, education, and welfare which are mirrored in widening disparities in outcomes for children, adolescents, and their families. These disparities must be addressed through research and training.

The CAFLE Center conducts research and provides training to master’s, doctoral, and postdoctoral students and mentors junior faculty. We apply epidemiological approaches in collaboration with other approaches, such as ethnography and qualitative studies in multi-disciplinary studies, to investigate child, adolescent, and family life in a manner that includes, but goes beyond, narrow definitions of health. The Center is modeled to provide an environment of scholarly and lively debate at the forefront of research methodology to academics partnering with communities. The CAFLE Center conducts both descriptive and evaluative work addressing key challenges and interventions both in the U.S. and abroad.

Central areas of expertise include: perinatal interventions, the study of injury, child development and disability, family violence, maternal and perinatal outcomes, and multicultural influences on health and well-being.

Methodologic themes include randomized trials of community and institutional interventions, evaluation of measures of well-being in children and their families, measurement of disability and of functional status, and approaches to screening.

- See more at: http://globalcommons.columbia.edu/content/child-adolescent-and-family-life-epidemiology#sthash.XU0IrFA5.dpuf

The Center for Child, Adolescent and Family Life Epidemiology (CAFLE) is grounded in four primary principles. First is the understanding that outcomes for children and families cross traditional boundaries of health, education, and social welfare; therefore, inter-disciplinary research and training are essential. Second, the world we live in is multicultural and global in nature. Old paradigms of developed and developing are no longer appropriate; a global continuum approach is essential. Third, mortality, an important and readily measured outcome, must also be complemented by functional measures such as child development and disability and quality of life. Fourth, there are nearly universal, systematic, and ongoing disparities in access to healthcare, education, and welfare which are mirrored in widening disparities in outcomes for children, adolescents, and their families. These disparities must be addressed through research and training.

The CAFLE Center conducts research and provides training to master’s, doctoral, and postdoctoral students and mentors junior faculty. We apply epidemiological approaches in collaboration with other approaches, such as ethnography and qualitative studies in multi-disciplinary studies, to investigate child, adolescent, and family life in a manner that includes, but goes beyond, narrow definitions of health. The Center is modeled to provide an environment of scholarly and lively debate at the forefront of research methodology to academics partnering with communities. The CAFLE Center conducts both descriptive and evaluative work addressing key challenges and interventions both in the U.S. and abroad.

Central areas of expertise include: perinatal interventions, the study of injury, child development and disability, family violence, maternal and perinatal outcomes, and multicultural influences on health and well-being.

Methodologic themes include randomized trials of community and institutional interventions, evaluation of measures of well-being in children and their families, measurement of disability and of functional status, and approaches to screening.

People

  • Professor of Epidemiology and Pediatrics at the Columbia University Medical Center
  • Assistant Professor of Population and Family Health at the Columbia University Medical Center